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Top 5 Favourite French Expressions (in slang) by Géraldine

Coucou !

Today’s episode was very funny to write because I had to search into the French I use everyday.
Not necessarly the most elegant one.

But the real French you’ll hear me and millions of others use everyday.

French expressions that don’t exist in dictionnaries and textbooks.
French you’ll hear in the metro, in the street, in cafes.

The French expressions that will make French eyebrows raise when you use them.
Trust me. 😉

Today, I’ll give you the inside track on 5 of my favourite colloquial French expressions.

Click to watch « My 5 favourite French expressions (in slang) »:

Et toi ?
Have you heard of these expressions? Which one is your favourite?
Let me know ONE French expression that still remains a mystery to you.

Share them below so we can all enjoy your story and help you unravel the mystery.

Bisous,

Géraldine

Salut c’est Géraldine.

Welcome to Comme une Française TV, live in France, feel at home.

When a foreigner is speaking in far-from-perfect French and then uses a VERY idiomatic French expression, I tend to go “WOW, you KNOW that expression?”. And the person gets my full attention straight away, no matter how bad their French is.

You know why this happens? Because we connected. She showed that she had insider knowledge of my language. Like a secret key.

INTRO

Today, on Comme une Française TV, I’ll give you the inside track on 5 of my favourite colloquial French expressions. Use them and watch those French eyesbrows raise.

1. Envoyer du pâté

“envoyer du pâté” means “to be awesome” (or, if you like, “to kick butt’!)

And “Envoyer du” can be declined in lots of ways: I’ve heard: Envoyer du lourd / envoyer du gros / envoyer du steak

If you want to say “it’s awesome” say : ça envoie du pâté And you can conjugate as well: il envoie du pâté / elle a envoyé du pâté

2. C’est trop bien

“Trop” is often used to say something is more than “très” It’s more than “very” and it’s almost “too much”.

We use it in many ways: “C’est trop beau / C’est trop bien / C’est trop cool…”

3. Sans déc.

Sans déconner means no kidding.

And we use the short version: sans déc.

4. Ça roule

Ça roule literally means “It’s rolling”. It means “OK” or “that works for me”.

We have lots of ways to say “ça roule” : Ça marche / c’est bon.

I love this expression: Ça roule ma poule. OK chick.

5. Tranquille

The adjective “Tranquille” means “calm, relaxed, unconcerned”. But in everyday French, it means “Sure/No problem.”

For example, I’d use it in “T’as réussi ton exam?” “Tranquille”. “Did you pass your exam? Tranquille.”

A similar expression is “Large.” literally meaning “wide”. Which is used in “Tu as réservé les vacances ? C’est dans 3 mois, on est large.”

Et toi ?

Your French will ONLY improve if you put into practice what you’ve learnt on Comme une Française TV.

Share your experiences by leaving a comment below this video :

Have you heard of these expressions? Which one is your favourite? Let me know me ONE French expression that still remains a mystery to you.

Share them below so we can all enjoy your story and help you unravel the mystery.

The comment section is the best place to start discussions and ask questions!

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Merci for watching Comme une Française TV: Live in France, feel at home.

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