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Holidays in France: What to Say, What to Do

Salut !

First, super important message:
if you want to improve your French Conversation, don’t miss my email next week.

Now, today’s video is about holidaaayyyyyys!

It’ll be summer soon and summer in France means… les grandes vacances !
In French, “les grandes vacances” refers to the two months of summer holidays children have.

Today, we’ll see French words and expressions for talking about what you’ll do,
where you’ll stay and how you’ll travel, in France or anywhere else in the world!

On y va ?

Et toi ?

What will you do this summer or during your next holidays?
Tell me in French using the words you just learned!

Bonne journée et à tout de suite dans les commentaires !

Géraldine

Bonus Material: Download the Transcript

Salut c’est Géraldine, bienvenue sur Comme une Française TV, Sound French, even to the French.

It’ll be summer soon and summer in France means… les grandes vacances ! In French, “les grandes vacances” refers to the two months of summer holidays.

Today, we’ll see French words and expressions for talking about what you’ll do, where you’ll stay and how you’ll travel, in France or anywhere else in the world!

On y va ?

1. Où aller ? (Where to go?)

I’ll give you examples using the words you’ll learn today:

Je vais à la montagne. = I’m going to the mountains. Je vais passer quelques jours à la campagne. = I’m going to spend a few days in the countryside. On part deux semaines à la plage. = We’re going to the beach for two weeks.

If you’re going to “un endroit précis” = a special place such as a city or a region, you can also say : On va à Paris / dans le Lubéron / en Bretagne / au Pays Basque…

Be careful here with the grammar. What we put before the name of the place (à or au or en or dans) depends on the gender of the place. It’s a point of grammar that would deserve a full episode. So I won’t go deeper here.

2. Que faire ? (What to do?)

We can relax when we’re on holiday,

Je vais bronzer / me dorer la pilule / lézarder “Bronzer” and the expression “se dorer la pilule” mean “to get a tan." And “lézarder” literally means “laze around” like a lizard: to enjoy lying in the hot sun and doing nothing.

Il préfère se reposer / Dormir / Glander / Glandouiller “Se reposer” is “to rest," dormir, you know this one--it means “to sleep," “glander” is slang for “hang around” and “glandouiller” is a defomation of glander meaning “hang around more or less, maybe." But we can also do many other things.

Je vais faire de la randonnée. I’m going hiking.

J’aime me baigner le matin. I like to swim in the morning.

Ils vont visiter des musées, une ville ou une région. They are going to visit museums, a city or a region.

On va se promener / se balader dans la région. “Se promener” and “se balader” mean go from one place to another without any real goal. It can mean “go for a walk,” but you can also “se balader” in your car.

3. Où loger ?

When you go on holidays in France (or anywhere else!) there are lots of options for places to stay.

On ira au camping. / On va camper. “Un camping” is a campsite. With water and electricity. While “camper” doesn’t necessarily imply going to such an organized place.

If you are more adventurous, try “dormir à la belle étoile” : “Sleep under the stars.”

J’ai loué un gîte / un chalet / un appartement / une maison. “Louer” is the verb “to rent." “Un gîte” is a holiday cottage, “un chalet” is in the mountains, “un appartement” is a flat, and “une maison,” a house.

On dormira à l’hôtel. We’ll sleep in a hotel.

If you’re looking for a bed and breakfast, it will be “J’ai réservé une chambre d’hôte." And for a youth hostel, it’s “une auberge de jeunesse.”

4. Grammar point

In the examples, you heard me use two forms of future tense. If we take the verb “manger," to eat, I used: “Je vais manger une pomme” is “le futur proche.” “Je mangerai une pomme” is “le futur simple.”

Le futur proche is for situations very close : “I’m going to eat an apple," literally. Le futur simple is more in the future : “I will eat an apple."

In everyday life, we use “futur proche” 90 percent of the time, even for events far in the future. I’d say “Je vais passer Noël à Paris cette année” (I will spend Christmas in Paris), even though it’s just… September.

I thought this was good to know because maybe you learned “futur simple” only at school and use it all the time. But we don’t. Worth telling you.

5. Exercise

You told me you liked the exercises at the end of the video. So let’s try together.

How would you say these things?:

I booked a cottage in the mountains.

J’ai réservé un chalet (ou un gite) à la montagne.

We are going to Paris for 10 days to walk around and visit museums.

On part 10 jours à Paris pour se promener et visiter des musées.

They are going to the beach to get a tan.

Ils vont à la plage pour bronzer.

Et toi ?

What will you do this summer or during your next holidays? Tell me in French using the words you just learned!

Share your experience (in French if you dare!) in the comments below. We can all learn from your story. The comment section is the best place to start discussions and ask questions!

--- If you liked this video, share it with your friends on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest! Help me spread the word about Comme une Française. Merci !

Love France? Dream of sounding French, even to the French? Learn how with me, Geraldine, on Comme une Française.com and subscribe to my email updates for exclusive tips on Real Life in France every Tuesday PLUS an exclusive video lesson: “Introduce yourself in French.”

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Merci for watching Comme une Française TV.

Allez, salut !

Bonus Material: Download the Transcript

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